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Why does our faith influence our choices on Sunday, but not on Monday?

 

Mark Labberton on Faith in the Workplace

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Don’t live in past darkness

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Guilt or Grace?

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How my Jesus sees me

The "sentence" that results

The “sentence” that results

Guilt and shame may make me work harder – for a while. But at the end of the day, that “hard work” is really me saying that Jesus’ sacrifice wasn’t enough … That I too have to contribute to my salvation.

The truth is that I am already free! I can serve my Lord in a spirit of gratitude, humility & joy. He has made me his own!

Christ’s Church – Interactive Style

Every March, nearly 20,000 people come to Austin for the South by Southwest Interactive conference (SxSWi).  They come from big companies and small, from every industry, from non-profits and multi-billion dollar global enterprises.  What they have in common is that they are very tuned in to all things digital … especially the use of social, digital and mobile media to reach audiences of all stripes.

So for 5 days every March, Austin becomes the networking capital of the world.  Even with over 500 panels and presentations to choose from, the most valuable part of the conference is that all of those people, with at least one shared interest and a proclivity towards communication, are in the same place at the same time.

As I lead in to the meat of this post (and I do tend to love the preamble to a fault – but hey, it’s my blog), let me give you a run-down of my spiritual history with SxSW:

  • 2009: Traveled down with a team from Humana (in Louisville, KY).  Was blown away – and swept away – by panels, parties, concerts, dinners, and business meetings.  I don’t remember thinking about Jesus during that trip.
  • 2010: I knew that I needed to keep my spiritual focus in the midst of the madness, so I resolved to go to church on Sunday.  I live on twitter, so I recall sending out a tweet to ask if anyone wanted to join me.  Nobody responded.  Undeterred, I got up early on Sunday and walked down the street to Austin CityLife Church (which was then meeting in The Parish – VERY Austin for a church to meet in a bar).
  • 2011: By now I lived in Austin, was regularly attending the Austin Stone Community Church, and was feeling purposeful about putting together a church outing.  I used a (then) new tool called Plancast to let people know that I’d love to “host” them at a service at the Stone.  A few (6, to be exact) people came, and friendships were formed.  You can read my recap of that experience here, in The Church and the Social Network


That brings us up to date.  This year, I had a feeling that God had good things in store for this project that’s been dubbed SxSWinspiration.  I thought it would be a lot more fun to work with some collaborators this year, so I brought in my longtime friend Bryan Person, and Michelle Batten, whom I’d met at SxSW in 2010 and was one of the 6 inaugural attendees for SxSWinspiration.  Together, after lots of prayer and conversation, we felt that it’d be cool to add some fellowship time in addition to worship … so we ended up creating two separate pieces:

  1. Breakfast downtown, within walking distance of the conference hotels
  2. Worship at the Stone, with transportation provided by any locals who could come


We again turned to PlanCast, and then God went to work [Note: God was really working all the time; I’m taking some literary license here.  Hey, it’s my blog].

On Sunday morning, I picked up 5 dozen breakfast tacos from El Arroyo (muy delicioso, trust me) and my new friend Joey McGirr grabbed a box of Starbucks.  We met at my company’s office at 6th and Congress, and waited to see if anyone would show up.  They did.

By my best count, we had 17 Christ-followers in the house, breaking bread and enjoying each other’s company.  They came from as nearby as Austin’s Clarksville neighborhood, and from as far away as London.  They were former pastors, app developers, front-end web programmers, physicians with a passion for providing healthcare in underserved communities, and digital security experts.  They worked for startups like BeRemedy and ROAR and for global leaders like Nokia and Gemalto.  The common elements: They all love and follow Jesus.  They share a passion for glorifying his name.  And they all work in fields that are traditionally not very friendly towards Christians.

After a simple prayer and some introductions, we just talked … mostly in groups of two or three – before separating either to come worship at the Stone or to head back to their conference business.  But we all agreed to a few more things before we went:

  1. The digital world in general, and SxSW in particular, are a mission field for us.
  2. We want to stay together throughout the year – to support each other personally and professionally – through prayer and our social networks.
  3. We hope to grow this group of “digital Christians” at SxSW – and eventually begin to bring seekers into our fold to learn about Jesus


So without further ado, let me introduce you to the cast of characters that is SxSWinspiration, part II:

Front Row, L-R: Jon Burkhart, Ivor Horn, Kim Hollenshead, Carl Bliss, Matt McKee
Middle Row, L-R: Annie Hsieh, Michelle Batten, Jay Ehret
Back Row, L-R: Blake Canterbury, Sean Valderas, Joey McGirr, Reed Smith, Mike Neumann, Matt Thomson, Greg Matthews and Bryan Person (NP were Greg Swan & Josh Jensen)

You can follow us all on Twitter here – as Bryan Person has been kind enough to curate a twitter list.  And you can see more pictures of the gang on this Flickr set.  We haven’t figured out exactly how we’re going to stay connected yet, but we will … I’ve already seen some great examples of this group supporting one another (through twitter and through simple showing up at real-life events), so I don’t doubt that trend will continue to grow.  Would love to hear your thoughts and questions in these comments – so fire away!

[Special thanks are due to Michelle Batten and Bryan Person for planning, prayer and support; to Joey McGirr for stepping in to fill an urgent need – coffee – on Sunday morning; to Jon Manning and Zac Allen at the Austin Stone for their prayers and support; and to my wife Amy Matthews for putting up with being a SxSWidow every year – and for her unceasing prayers, support and love].

SxSWinspiration is ON!

I’m so excited to host a group of Christians this morning during the South by Southwest (SxSW) Interactive festival.  Today we’ll be meeting for breakfast and fellowship, and for those who’d like to do so, continuing on to worship at the Austin Stone Community Church‘s 11:15 service.

If you’d like to participate, here’s the information you’ll need:

When: 9:30 AM on Sunday the 11th.  Don’t forget that we LOST AN HOUR last night!  Daylight savings is now upon us.

Where: WCG.  101 W. 6th St., Suite 330 (Google Maps Link)

How: Come to the 6th Street entrance of the Scarbrough Building, between Gold’s Gym and Ruth’s Chris.  Security will let you in; mention Greg Matthews or WCG and you’ll be fine.  Come to the 3rd floor; suite 330 is in the back.

What: Fellowship, Coffee, OJ and El Arroyo Breakfast Tacos (they’re SO GOOD!) 😉

Who: Your hosts today are Greg Matthews, Michelle Batten and Bryan Person

Does Jesus want miracles for our lives?

I’ve been working on a new daily bible reading plan this year – M’Cheyne – and I’ll be writing more on that in a later post. For now, I wanted to focus on something that really struck me from my reading this morning. If you grew up in Sunday school, or have spent much time in the bible, you’ll have read about Peter walking on water somewhere between dozens and thousands of times. But I had some different eyes this morning:

28 “Lord, if it’s you,” Peter replied, “tell me to come to you on the water.”

29 “Come,” he said.

Then Peter got down out of the boat, walked on the water and came toward Jesus. 30 But when he saw the wind, he was afraid and, beginning to sink, cried out, “Lord, save me!”

31 Immediately Jesus reached out his hand and caught him. “You of little faith,” he said, “why did you doubt?”

Matthew 14:28-31, NIV 1984

There are a few things that stand out for me here. First, Peter’s instinct is remarkable. I’m trying to imagine myself as Peter, and wondering what he was thinking about. Yes, he’s seen Jesus working miracles. But at this point, there have been few, if any, that impacted any of the disciples personally. Yet when Peter – in the middle of the night – realizes that he’s not seeing a ghost on the waters, but his teacher, doesn’t merely look on in wonderment or glorify God. He asks Christ if he, too, can walk on the water to meet his Master. To me, that speaks to a special kind of faith. A faith that essentially blocks every fact – including the law of gravity and any knowledge about the physical properties of water – and focuses every ounce of his being on his Christ and the desire to be with him. How often is my faith so exclusive? How often does my faith produce the kind of Christ-centered tunnel-vision that Peter experienced?

The second thing that made me really put on my thinking cap this morning was Jesus’ response. He didn’t say, “hang on, Pete, I’ll be there in a minute.” He didn’t say, “Peter, don’t waste my time with foolishness – just wait in the boat.” He simply said, “Come.” I imagine him smiling in a combination of joy and amusement at Peter’s childlike faith. And it made me wonder what I would be capable of – in Christ – if I just asked earnestly to walk with my Master. Would anything be impossible?

A million little choices

Watch this clip. Henry (Michael Keaton) is trying to convince his wife that he’ll be there when the chips are down. But every day, he makes little choices that favor his job over his family.

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A Million Little Choices

On the road someone asked if he could go along. “I’ll go with you, wherever,” he said.  Jesus was curt: “Are you ready to rough it? We’re not staying in the best inns, you know.”

Jesus said to another, “Follow me.” He said, “Certainly, but first excuse me for a couple of days, please. I have to make arrangements for my father’s funeral.”  Jesus refused. “First things first. Your business is life, not death. And life is urgent: Announce God’s kingdom!”

Then another said, “I’m ready to follow you, Master, but first excuse me while I get things straightened out at home.”  Jesus said, “No procrastination. No backward looks. You can’t put God’s kingdom off till tomorrow. Seize the day.”

Luke 9:57-62, The Message

It occurred to me that our choice to follow Jesus is like Henry’s choice. That’s right … It’s never one big choice . .. Its a million little choices, every day, that add up to the same thing.

Jesus, or everything else? I read about the saints throughout the ages who suffered torture and death because they proclaimed Jesus. Would I be tortured or die for Jesus? I might be wrong, but I think I would. I can’t imagine a scenario where I’d be offered the choice to renounce Christ or die – and failing to choose Christ.

But that’s not likely to be a situation I face. However, I face a million little choices every day too. Choices about proclaiming Christ when it’s uncomfortable (in the office, perhaps). Choices to stand out from the crowd and honor God through behavior that might be unpopular. If I’m truly honest with myself, I almost NEVER choose Jesus in those circumstances – I’m too much of a chicken. Too afraid that people won’t like me – hence the name of this blog.

And that’s a problem. My prayer for today: That God will guide my heart in the little decisions – because when they’re about Jesus, they’re just as important as the big ones.

[Thanks to anyclip.com for the clip. And on a side note, “The Paper” is a favorite movie of mine … action-packed from start to finish, and Michael Keaton is hilarious.  And for any geeks out there, this clip embeds perfectly into the blogger platform, but does NOTHING in wordpress.  Here’s the embed code; any ideas?

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The Sermon on the Mount

Sometimes I think that people who don’t believe in Jesus are turned off by what they see in the church.  In this country especially, where we have a “civil religion” that many people call “Christianity” but really isn’t, it’s easy to get confused.

The best way to get around that, of course, is to forget about the church for a while – and learn who Jesus is.  Where did he go?  What did he say?  What did he do?  That’s why I love this video sermon from the Austin Stone‘s Matt Carter: He’s simply standing on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, under the Mount of Beatitudes, and reading Christ’s words from the bible.  No commentary or explanation.  Just Jesus.  It’s remarkable.

Sermon on the Mount from The Austin Stone on Vimeo.

On Comfort

I’ve noticed recently what incredibly comfort I have found in my morning bible study.  It’s become a time that makes me feel safe.  It makes me feel whole and close to God.  Taking comfort in God is exactly what we’re meant to do all of our lives.

But I’ve also come to be wary of comfort … because it’s easy for personal comfort to become an idol.

Take your comfort in God … but don’t let your comfort become your god.

——————————-

I began writing that post about 3 months ago … but something told me to hold on posting it.  Since then, I’ve sold my comfortable house and bought another one that is a bit more of a project … because I felt that God was calling us to do so.  So at least in one instance, I’ve been able to practice what I’ve preached. 😉

The management lessons of Boaz

My bible reading plan (REAP) called for reading the first chapter of Ruth today.  But without knowing it, this delightful story swept me away – and I read the whole thing.  After reading the end of the book of Judges, it was so welcome to read about people who honored God, and treated each other with love.  The way that the principals of the story – Naomi, Ruth and Boaz – treated one another and everyone around them was so exemplary!  They were full of humility, put others before themselves, and showed honesty and integrity in every interaction.

As a businessman, I’m particularly interested in the way that Boaz operated.  And I found myself thinking about how I could be more like him in my work.  The first thing that stood out to me was his competence – as a businessman AND as a leader.  The story says that he was wealthy – but it’s also apparent that a) he had a significant number of workers, and b) that they respected and obeyed him.  He asked his workers to do some pretty strange (though clearly compassionate) things to accommodate Ruth, but his workers obeyed without question.  This tells me that he maintained a close enough proximity to the work that he knew what was going on all over the operation, but also maintained enough distance to be able to see the big picture.  He noticed Ruth, asked about her, and was able to immediately give instructions to his workers on hoe to handle the situation – he saw the big picture clearly.

He was personally invested in the success of his ventures.  When it came to threshing time, he was there with his crew, working hard all day and presumably into the night.  And he celebrated success with hid team – eating, drinking and making merry to celebrate a job well done.

Finally, he showed both shrewdness and integrity in dealing eith his peers.  When he approached Naomi’s closest relative to ask about redeeming her husband ‘s land, he knew all along that he wanted to have the land – but especially the prize that came with it (Ruth)!  So rather than starting to negotiate to buy the right to redeem Ruth, he approached the man, in the presence of witnesses, and suggested that he redeem Naomi’s property.  Only after the man verbally agreed did Boaz raise the issue of Ruth being a part of the package.  Since the man didn’t want to be in a position of splitting his inheritance eith another branch of the family (a fact which Boaz likely knew), the man withdrew his claim, and *freely offered it to Boaz in the presence of ten respected witnesses.*. Nobody associated with that transaction could say that Boaz was anything but fair, gnereous and honest in that transaction – AND he came away with the thing he wanted most.

I’m spending time today thinking how I can manage more like Boaz did.  How can you?